Literacy and Script Reform in Occupation Japan

This book challenges the widespread belief that overzealous Americans forced unnecessary script reforms on an unprepared, unenthusiastic, but helpless Japan during the Occupation.

Literacy and Script Reform in Occupation Japan

This book challenges the widespread belief that overzealous Americans forced unnecessary script reforms on an unprepared, unenthusiastic, but helpless Japan during the Occupation. Unger presents neglected historical evidence showing that the reforms implemented from 1946 to 1959 were both necessary and moderate. Although the United States Education Mission of 1946 recommended that the Japanese give serious consideration to the introduction of alphabetic writing, key American officials in the Civil Information and Education Section of GHQ/SCAP delayed and effectively killed action on this recommendation. Japanese advocates of romanization nevertheless managed to obtain CI&E approval for an experiment in elementary schools to test the hypothesis that schoolchildren could make faster progress if spared the necessity of studying Chinese characters as part of non-language courses such as arithmetic. Though not conclusive, the experiment's results supported the hypothesis and suggested the need for more and better testing. Yet work was brought to a halt a year ahead of schedule; the Ministry of Education was ordered to prepare a report that misrepresented the goal of the experiment and claimed it proved nothing. The whole episode dropped from official and scholarly view--until the publication of this book.

More Books:

Literacy and Script Reform in Occupation Japan
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: J. Marshall Unger
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996-08-01 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

This book challenges the widespread belief that overzealous Americans forced unnecessary script reforms on an unprepared, unenthusiastic, but helpless Japan during the Occupation. Unger presents neglected historical evidence showing that the reforms implemented from 1946 to 1959 were both necessary and moderate. Although the United States Education Mission of 1946
Literacy and Script Reform in Occupation Japan
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: J. Marshall Unger
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

This book challenges the widespread belief that overzealous Americans forced unnecessary script reforms on an unprepared, unenthusiastic, but helpless Japan during the Occupation. Unger presents neglected historical evidence showing that the reforms implemented from 1946 to 1959 were both necessary and moderate. Although the United States Education Mission of 1946
Ideogram
Language: en
Pages: 216
Authors: J. Marshall Unger
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-10-31 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

In this latest book, J. Marshall Unger exposes the historical, scientific, cultural, and practical flaws accompanying the widespread belief that Chinese characters embody pure, language-less meaning. Whether one is interested in Chinese characters from the standpoint of language, literature, semiotics, psychology, history, cultural studies, or computers, Ideogram contains new ideas
The Role of Contact in the Origins of the Japanese and Korean Languages
Language: en
Pages: 207
Authors: J. Marshall Unger
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

Despite decades of research on the reconstruction of proto-Korean-Japanese (pKJ), some scholars still reject a genetic relationship. This study addresses their doubts in a new way, interpreting comparative linguistic data within a context of material and cultural evidence, much of which has come to light only in recent years. The
Reading Food in Modern Japanese Literature
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Tomoko Aoyama
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-09-30 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

"gourmet boom" of the 1980s and 1990s concealed: the dangers of a market economy, environmental destruction, and continuing gender biases.