The American Idea of England 1776 1840

Chapters examine political writing as a means for Americans to explore the Anglo-American relationship, the appropriation of John Bull by American writers, the challenge the War of 1812 posed to the reconstructed Anglo-American relationship ...

The American Idea of England  1776 1840

Arguing that American colonists who declared their independence in 1776 remained tied to England by both habit and inclination, Jennifer Clark traces the new Americans' struggle to come to terms with their loss of identity as British, and particularly English, citizens. Americans' attempts to negotiate the new Anglo-American relationship are revealed in letters, newspaper accounts, travel reports, essays, song lyrics, short stories and novels, which Clark suggests show them repositioning themselves in a transatlantic context newly defined by political revolution. Chapters examine political writing as a means for Americans to explore the Anglo-American relationship, the appropriation of John Bull by American writers, the challenge the War of 1812 posed to the reconstructed Anglo-American relationship, the Paper War between American and English authors that began around the time of the War of 1812, accounts by Americans lured to England as a place of poetry, story and history, and the work of American writers who dissected the Anglo-American relationship in their fiction. Carefully contextualised historically, Clark's persuasive study shows that any attempt to examine what it meant to be American in the New Nation, and immediately beyond, must be situated within the context of the Anglo-American relationship.

More Books:

The American Idea of England, 1776-1840
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: Jennifer Clark
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-01 - Publisher: Routledge

Arguing that American colonists who declared their independence in 1776 remained tied to England by both habit and inclination, Jennifer Clark traces the new Americans' struggle to come to terms with their loss of identity as British, and particularly English, citizens. Americans' attempts to negotiate the new Anglo-American relationship are
The American Idea of England, 1776-1840
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: Jennifer Clark
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-01 - Publisher: Routledge

Arguing that American colonists who declared their independence in 1776 remained tied to England by both habit and inclination, Jennifer Clark traces the new Americans' struggle to come to terms with their loss of identity as British, and particularly English, citizens. Americans' attempts to negotiate the new Anglo-American relationship are
American Exceptionalism
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Ian Tyrrell
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-12-10 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

A powerful dissection of a core American myth. The idea that the United States is unlike every other country in world history is a surprisingly resilient one. Throughout his distinguished career, Ian Tyrrell has been one of the most influential historians of the idea of American exceptionalism, but he has
Handbook of Transatlantic North American Studies
Language: en
Pages: 632
Authors: Julia Straub
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-10 - Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

Transatlantic literary studies have provided important new perspectives on North American, British and Irish literature. They have led to a revision of literary history and the idea of a national literature. They have changed the perception of the Anglo-American literary market and its many processes of transatlantic production, distribution, reception
Alternate Histories and Nineteenth-Century Literature
Language: en
Pages: 292
Authors: Ben Carver
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-17 - Publisher: Springer

This book provides the first thematic survey and analysis of nineteenth-century writing that imagined outcomes that history might have produced. Narratives of possible worlds and scenarios—referred to here as “alternate histories”—proliferated during the nineteenth century and clustered around pressing themes and emergent disciplines of knowledge. This study examines accounts of