More Books:

The Pre-biblical Narrative Tradition
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Simon B. Parker
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 1989 - Publisher: Society of Biblical Literature

Books about The Pre-biblical Narrative Tradition
Biblical Narrative and Palestine's History
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Thomas L. Thompson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-09-11 - Publisher: Routledge

Modern biblical scholarship's commitment to the historical-critical method in its efforts to write a history of Israel has created the central and unavoidable problem of writing an objective and critical history of Palestine through the biblical literature with the methods of Biblical Archaeology. 'Biblical Narrative and Palestine's History' brings together
Biblical Narrative and the Death of the Rhapsode
Language: en
Pages: 312
Authors: Robert S. Kawashima
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004-12-09 - Publisher: Indiana University Press

Informed by literary theory and Homeric scholarship as well as biblical studies, Biblical Narrative and the Death of the Rhapsode sheds new light on the Hebrew Bible and, more generally, on the possibilities of narrative form. Robert S. Kawashima compares the narratives of the Hebrew Bible with Homeric and Ugaritic
Poetic Heroes
Language: en
Pages: 660
Authors: Mark S. Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-09-15 - Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

Warfare exerts a magnetic power, even a terrible attraction, in its emphasis on glory, honor, and duty. In order to face the terror of war, it is necessary to face how our biblical traditions have made it attractive -- even alluring. In this book Mark Smith undertakes an extensive exploration
God in Translation
Language: en
Pages: 382
Authors: Mark S. Smith
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-06-28 - Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

God in Translation offers a substantial, extraordinarily broad survey of ancient attitudes toward deities, from the Late Bronze Age through ancient Israel and into the New Testament. Looking closely at relevant biblical texts and at their cultural contexts, Mark S. Smith demonstrates that the biblical attitude toward deities of other