The Psychopharmacology of Herbal Medicine

" This is an active research area, however, and many current studies are focusing on identifying the active components, pharmacological properties, physiological effects, and clinical efficacy of herbal medicines.

The Psychopharmacology of Herbal Medicine

A compilation of current scientific knowledge about psychoactive herbal drugs. Virtually all cultures consume drugs from psychoactive plants. Caffeine, for example, is probably the most common stimulant in the world, and many modern medicines, such as morphine and codeine, are derived from plant sources. In these cases, scientific research has revealed the composition of the plants and how they interact with the nervous system. There are also many herbal medications with reputed therapeutic value that have not yet gained acceptance into mainstream medicine, partly because there has not been enough research to support their usefulness. Instead they are regarded as "alternative medicines." This is an active research area, however, and many current studies are focusing on identifying the active components, pharmacological properties, physiological effects, and clinical efficacy of herbal medicines. This book compiles and integrates the most up-to-date information on the major psychoactive herbal medicines—that is, herbal medicines that alter mind, brain, and behavior. It focuses particularly on the effects on various areas of cognition, including attention, learning, and memory. The book covers all major classes of psychoactive drugs, including stimulants, cognitive enhancers, sedatives and anxiolytics, psychotherapeutic herbs, analgesics and anesthetic plants, hallucinogens, and cannabis.

More Books:

The Psychopharmacology of Herbal Medicine
Language: en
Pages: 590
Authors: Marcello Spinella
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001-06-08 - Publisher: MIT Press

A compilation of current scientific knowledge about psychoactive herbal drugs. Virtually all cultures consume drugs from psychoactive plants. Caffeine, for example, is probably the most common stimulant in the world, and many modern medicines, such as morphine and codeine, are derived from plant sources. In these cases, scientific research has
Handbook of Psychotropic Herbs
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Ethan Russo, Virginia M. Tyler
Categories: Gardening
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001 - Publisher: Routledge

Reliable and fact-filled, the Handbook of Psychotropic Herbs: A Scientific Analysis of Herbal Remedies for Psychiatric Conditions offers psychiatrists, psychologists, counselors, physicians, and students in these fields a comprehensive review of the history, pharmacology, chemistry, and uses of medicinal herbs. A valuable resource for understanding today's unregulated herbal marketplace, this
Concise Handbook of Psychoactive Herbs
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Marcello Spinella
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-31 - Publisher: Routledge

Find out how plant-derived drugs react with your brain to produce either healing or harmful results! The Concise Handbook of Psychoactive Herbs will give you a better understanding of herbal products that have psychological effects. The book explores how they work, how effective they are, and what is known about
Social Work Practice and Psychopharmacology, Second Edition
Language: en
Pages: 552
Authors: Sophia Dziegielewski PhD, LCSW
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-12-07 - Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

Why do social workers need to know about mental health medications? How can social workers best assist clients who are taking medications? What is the social worker's role as part of the interdisciplinary health care team? Answering these questions and more, this comprehensive text discusses the major medications used to
Herbal Medicine in Depression
Language: en
Pages: 585
Authors: Clara Grosso
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-30 - Publisher: Springer

This book is written for researchers, undergraduate students and postgraduate students, physicians and traditional medicine practitioners who develop research in the field of neurosciences, phytochemistry and ethnopharmacology or can be useful for their practice. Topics discussed include the description of depression, its biochemical causes, the targets of antidepressant drugs, animal