Women Without Class

Publisher Description

Women Without Class

Publisher Description

More Books:

Women Without Class
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Julie Bettie
Categories: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

Publisher Description
Women without Class
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Julie Bettie
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-09-18 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

In this ethnographic examination of Mexican-American and white girls coming of age in California’s Central Valley, Julie Bettie turns class theory on its head, asking what cultural gestures are involved in the performance of class, and how class subjectivity is constructed in relationship to color, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. A
The Structure of Schooling
Language: en
Pages: 782
Authors: Richard Arum, Irenee R. Beattie, Karly Ford
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-12 - Publisher: SAGE

This comprehensive reader in the sociology of education examines important topics and exposes students to examples of sociological research on schools. Drawing from classic and contemporary scholarship, the editors have chosen readings that examine current issues and reflect diverse theoretical approaches to studying the effects of schooling on individuals and
African American Girls and the Construction of Identity
Language: en
Pages: 204
Authors: Sheila Walker
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-10-15 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

African American Girls and the Construction of Identity explores identity formation among African American adolescent girls through the lens of socioeconomic class.
Intersectionality, Class and Migration
Language: en
Pages: 193
Authors: Mastoureh Fathi
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-11 - Publisher: Springer

This book offers critical analysis of everyday narratives of Iranian middle class migrants who use their social class and careers to "fit in" with British society. Based on a series of interviews and participant observations with two cohorts of "privileged" Iranian migrant women working as doctors, dentists and academics in